The Turn of the Screw

Portland Shakespeare Project

 

"Millican’s governess is a volatile blend of innocence, shock and determination, and she plays the shifts in temperament like a movie palace organist, now gasping, now laughing, now embracing, now defying the universe in a resonant crescendo."

 

- Oregon Arts Watch

full review

 

 

"Millican, always good in whatever productions I’ve reviewed her in, is captivating, commanding, and a little scary as the conflicted matriarch of this beleaguered brood.  She always rides that thin line between what may be real and what may not be.  This may be Millican’s finest hour!"

 

- Dennis Sparks Reviews

full review

 

 

Dead Man's Cell Phone

Profile Theatre

 

"Millican, a petite strawberry blonde with a strong presence, brings the elements of the play together. She is both viewer and breathless participant, and we identify with her voyage of the absurd, which even takes her to the afterlife where she visits Gordon and learns that folks have to wash their own clothes at laundromats. In a very funny fight scene, the actor shows off her combat skills. She's the busiest performer and slides into the role seamlessly."

 

- The Oregonian

full review

 

 

"This slightly absurdist, slightly comic-book, highly whimsical, and emotionally serious play takes a headlong leap down the rabbit hole, and Millican makes an ideal, engagingly sympathetic contemporary Alice, balancing the role’s cartoon and realist aspects to create a captivating wonderland. Ruhl’s play seems simple but requires a tough-to-pull-off balance between reality and fantasy. Millican gives director Adriana Baer’s production its robustly beating heart by keeping one foot in an increasingly strange reality and one in an increasingly logical absurdism."

 

- Oregon Arts Watch

full review

 

 

"Dana Millican portrays Jean with just the right mix of bewilderment and kindness, even amid the character’s bald-faced lying..."

 

- Willamette Week

full review

 

 

"Millican is excellent as the very human Jean-it is easy to picture yourself making the same choices along the way, and eventually ending up in an afterlife laundromat of your very own."

 

- Broadway World

full review

 

 

"Millican, as I’ve noted before in reviews of shows she’s in, is always a pleasure to watch.  She keeps you guessing all the time as to her motives and decisions as to what her character does.  An original creation."

 

- Dennis Sparks Reviews

full review

 

 

'night, Mother

CoHo Productions

 

"Millican may seem a bit perfunctory in her relation to her mother at the start of the play — her announcement of her imminent death may seem abrupt as she desperately tries to stay on track moving through the list of items that she needs to address with her Mother before she departs. Still, under the pressure of [Jacklyn] Maddux's Thelma, we can see the controlled façade crack. Even more, any suspicion we might have that her announcement is more of a call for help than the revelation of an actual plan of action is dispelled when we see Millican's portrayal of Jesse's eventual frustration at her mother's reaction to her announcement. Millican adeptly conveys Jesse's belief that her mother's response is just another example of how Jesse screws up everything in her life — even her own death."

 

- The Oregonian

full review

 

 

"Dana Millican makes Jessie almost clinically focused on her task, seemingly unemotional and decisive, but the pain eventually boils over. She tones down her beauty, looking pale and uninterested in her appearance, and she gives us just a hint of the warmth Jessie is reluctant to share with others...It all works beautifully, and at the end of the play the audience was completely still. No sound, no movement, no applause. Just pure, stunned silence until the two actresses returned to take their well-deserved bows."

 

- Broadway World

full review

 

 

"Do not enter Coho Theater for ‘Night, Mother expecting to be anything but emotionally wrecked...Dana Millican offers an equally strong performance as Jessie, shifting from solemnly determined to calmly logical to raw and emotional...It all makes for an uncomfortable and absorbing look into an everyday relationship, and one that is likely to make for a very quiet ride home from the theater."

 

- Willamette Week

full review

 

 

Ithaka

Artists Repertory Theatre

 

"Dana Millican is exceptional as Elaine. She's onstage almost throughout the play, and her character goes through every emotion from glee to terror, but Millican never calls attention to her performance. She's just there, in character from the first moment we see her, tensely searching for a missing cat. She has the physical presence and vocal authority to make you believe she could lead a platoon into combat, but she doesn't overplay it. Elaine has the vocabulary of a soldier, and she's constantly using four-letter words to put people off, yet she's still feminine and vulnerable underneath the bravado. It's a wrenching performance, physically and emotionally, but what impressed me most was Millican's restraint."

 

- Broadway World 

full review

 

 

"Millican shows us the inner turmoil breaking through Lanie’s tough exterior; her mastery of the emotional arc of the story had audience members tearing and sniffling by the end of Friday’s opening-night performance."

 

- The Oregonian 

full review

 

 

"Played with fierce authenticity by Dana Millican, Lanie blows up at her husband (Paul Angelo) and can’t forgive herself for letting out the cat. Her often rapid-fire dialogue serves to mask the things she doesn’t want to address. Millican embodies a woman both strong and broken, imbued with enough genuine emotion to avoid cliché."

 

Willamette Week

 

 

"Dana Millican, best known for her work in local Shakespeare productions, gives a Bard-worthy performance in the very contemporary, and very demanding, role of Elaine."

 

- Portland Monthly

full review

 

 

"Millican is super as the main character.  She has a naturalistic style which makes it appear that she is not even acting.  And she jumps from one emotion to [the] other in a split second."

 

- Dennis Sparks Reviews

full review

 

 

The Lost Boy

Artists Repertory Theatre

 

"Dana Millican is emotionally affecting as a mother bound in sorrows and desperation."

 

- The Oregonian

full review

 

 

"Perhaps the most riveting scene (both in acting, by Ms. Millican and writing, by Ms.  Mach) in the show is the monologue in the second act, in which she describes another demon that haunts her.  It is a spell-binding moment."

 

- Dennis Sparks Reviews

full review

 

 

Othello

Northwest Classical Theatre Company

 

"...Dana Millican creates a sturdy, brittle Emilia, who shines in the last act with utter conviction."

 

- The Oregonian

full review

 

 

King John

Northwest Classical Theatre Company

 

"Even Dana Millican's Constance, a mother who suffers the loss of her child, is never reduced to pathetic helplessness. She fiercely rages as she beckons death to relieve her of her suffering. When Millican's Constance contemplates her heartbreaking loss, her voice might break, but only momentarily before her fire returns, and she savagely rebukes the treachery of her so-called allies."

 

- The Oregonian

full review

 

 

"...earnest, decent performances all around—notably Dana Millican’s incandescent turn as should-be-king Arthur’s mama grizzly."

 

-Willamette Week
 

 

King Lear

Portland Shakespeare Project 

 

"Millican’s excellent turn in the dual role as the conniving and lustful for power Edmund, perhaps one of the most treacherous roles in the canon besides Iago..."

 

- Portland Stage Reviews